Pet Emergency Training for First Responders on KSBY

Pet Emergency Training for First Responders on KSBY

Santa Barbara County firefighters are going through a series of workshops teaching them how to handle and help injured pets and animals.

“Anything from the basics of assessing a pet’s health at the given time and then to providing things like fluid and CPR and wound treatment. It just helps bridge that gap that otherwise a pet might suffer or even die in an emergency situation,” said Isabelle Gullo, C.A.R.E.4Paws Executive Director and Co-Founder.

On Monday, the non-profit organization C.A.R.E.4Paws, alongside pet emergency hospital Advanced Veterinary Specialists, and dog trainer Brian Glen, hosted the first of 12 workshops.

According to Santa Barbara County Fire Department Battalion Chief Tom Himmelrich, first responders are not typically trained on how to handle or provide medical attention to pets such as cats and dogs.

However, that will no longer be the case for Santa Barbara County firefighters.

“This will just give us another tool to be able to better serve the community and animals and get them to better care,” said Himmelrich.

While the animals used in the training demonstrations are calm and easy to work with, that likely will change in the field when pets may be found in distress or pain.

“We are doing the best we can to prepare the first responders and firefighters for these different scenarios,” said Gullo.

The two-hour workshops consist of hands-on medical training, including everything from knowing how to give a cat or dog oxygen to learning how to properly bandage an injured leg was covered during the session.

“I learned how to put a quick muzzle on a dog by using a leash and that would just make it safer if we are concerned about a dog potentially biting us while we are trying to treat it,” said Himmelrich.

According to C.A.R.E.4Paws, pet first aid kits are in the works to be carried on fire engines and other emergency vehicles.

C.A.R.E.4Paws also has many other services they offer like free spays and neuters, as well as low cost veterinary care. To learn more, click here.

This was the fist of 12 upcoming workshops with the Santa Barbara County Fire Department.

According to the American Animal Hospital Association, one out of four animals would survive a life-threatening injury if just one first aid technique was used before the pet were to reach a veterinary hospital.

Original Article:

https://www.ksby.com/news/community/vista-semanal/local/santa-barbara-county-firefighters-learn-how-to-aid-injured-pets 

Pet Emergency Training for First Responders in the Santa Maria and Santa Ynez Times and the Lompoc Recorder

Pet Emergency Training for First Responders in the Santa Maria and Santa Ynez Times and the Lompoc Recorder

By Mike Hodgson:

Santa Barbara County firefighters will soon be better prepared to deal with injured pets they encounter after they receive training in a series of workshops that started Monday in Orcutt.

 

First responders with the County Fire Department will receive pet emergency training from Advanced Veterinary Specialists and dog trainer Brian Glen in a dozen free workshops covering 16 fire stations, said Isabelle Gullo, co-founder and executive director of C.A.R.E.4Paws.

 

Gullo said one out of four animals that die from life-threatening injuries would survive if just one first-aid technique was applied before the pet reached a veterinary hospital, according to American Animal Hospital Association.

 

But firefighters, rescue personnel and even paramedics and emergency medical technicians who are usually the first to arrive at a fire, crash or other emergency, are generally not trained to provide medical treatment to pets, she said.

 

So last November, the nonprofit organization launched Pet Emergency Training, or PET, for First Responders to teach them how to safely care for and treat pets they encounter in emergency situations.

 

Broad training

In the workshops, firefighters will learn how to recognize animals’ injuries, determine their severity and provide appropriate initial treatment before they can be picked up by officers from the Division of Animal Control.

 

“When a cat is burned, you can’t tell how badly injured it is until a couple of days later,” Gullo said. “By then, the organs are already shutting down.”

 

In addition to recognizing injuries and their severity, Dr. Andrea Wells, owner of Advanced Veterinary Specialists and an internal medicine specialist, said firefighters will receive at least an hour of hands-on medical training.

One dog’s animosity toward a mail carrier has led to the suspension of mail delivery for dozens of homes in a northwest Santa Maria neighborhood. The suspension began June 6 after the dog charged at a United States Postal Service carrier who was delivering mail to a neighboring home, according to Postal Service spokeswoman Meiko Patton.

“Immediate care and stabilization can be key to a successful recovery from injury,” Wells said.

 

The hands-on training will range from animal CPR, wound treatment and handling of broken limbs to how to provide fluids and other critical care to an overheated animal.

 

“We’re more involved with dogs injured in vehicle accidents than structure fires, so that’s very helpful for me,” said Capt. Cesar Martinez of County Fire Station 26, formerly Station 22, at the corner of Tiffany Park Court and Stillwell Avenue in Orcutt.

 

Firefighters will get to practice the various techniques with dogs and cats owned by Advanced Veterinary Specialists staff members.

 

During a visit to Station 26 on Friday, Gullo told Martinez and Capt. Lenny Maniscalco, from Station 30 in Solvang, that many of the procedures can be performed with equipment firefighters already use.

 

But she noted special pet first-aid kits are being prepared for firefighters to carry on every truck.

 

“They will have pet CPR masks of different sizes, things like that,” she said.

 

Most cats and dogs act differently when injured or in distress, so the animal trainer will provide techniques for safely capturing, handling and restraining pets to ensure they receive medical treatment or remove them from a dangerous situation.

 

Glen also will talk about dog psychology and how to deal with protective or aggressive dogs that can harm a first responder and prevent a pet owner from receiving timely critical care.

 

“Often we run into cases where [injured] people have got animals,” Maniscalco said. “That would help us understand in body language what [the animals] are feeling.”

 

Double benefit

Firefighter Sam Dudley, who’s assigned to Station 12 in Goleta, said the pet rescue training is a great opportunity for the department and the public.

 

“I think we recognize, as firefighters, these furry friends of ours are like part of the family,” he said. “We’re very excited to add another tool to our toolkit to serve the public.”

 

Dudley noted the training will have a dual benefit.

 

“Aside from being able to help the public, the department has two canines and we’re getting a third,” he said. “One is a live search dog — it searches for live individuals. One is an arson dog, an accelerant dog, that looks for evidence of arson.

 

“The new one, for which I will be the handler, is an emotional support canine,” he continued. “That dog will be able to provide emotional support for us as well as statewide.

 

“The suicide rate in fire departments is the same as — if not slightly higher than — it is in the military right now,” he said. “It’s become a real problem. County Fire understands the importance of having these emotional support dogs.”

 

Dudley said if one of the department’s three canines should be injured while in the field, firefighters will be able to use what they’ve learned in the workshops to treat the dogs and potentially save their lives.

 

Original Article:

https://santamariatimes.com/news/local/santa-barbara-county-firefighters-to-be-trained-in-pet-first/article_1cfd453a-1ed0-563e-9065-efa68d4dc560.html#tracking-source=home-top-story-1

Safe Haven Domestic Violence Assistance Program in the Santa Maria and Santa Ynez Times

Safe Haven Domestic Violence Assistance Program in the Santa Maria and Santa Ynez Times

For the first time in Santa Barbara County, victims of domestic violence have a safe place to take their pets as they seek shelter from abusive partners.

 

On Saturday, C.A.R.E.4Paws, Domestic Violence Solutions for Santa Barbara County, area animal shelters and pet service providers launched Safe Haven, a new program designed to provide a temporary, anonymous refuge for the pets of those fleeing domestic violence.

 

Abuse victims can now leave with their pets to enter emergency shelters managed by Domestic Violence Solutions, and confidential foster care or boarding for the animals will be arranged by C.A.R.E.4Paws, said Isabelle Gullo, co-founder and executive director.

Once the survivor is safe and in a stable environment, pets and owners are reunited, Gullo said.

 

Partner agencies involved with logistics include Advanced Veterinary Specialists and ASAP, the Animal Shelter Assistance Program. Additional partner agencies are DAWG, the Dog Adoption Welfare Group, and the Santa Ynez Valley Humane Society, which are in the process of merging.

 

Organizations involved in preventing and assisting victims of domestic violence say the Safe Haven program fills a critical need.

 

According to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, abuse by an intimate partner often involves every member of the family, including pets that are harmed or killed by an abuser to control other family members.

 

Surveys show 85% of women entering domestic violence shelters reported their pets had been threatened, tortured or killed by their partners.

 

Jan Campbell, executive director of Domestic Violence Solutions, said she believes the partnership with C.A.R.E.4Paws will become an essential part of the shelter services the organization offers victims with pets.

 

“Knowing that their beloved pets are safely and confidentially housed helps to mitigate trauma suffered by domestic violence survivors and their families,” Campbell said.

 

Gullo said pets enrolled in Safe Haven will not only be sheltered but will also have access to veterinary care through C.A.R.E.4Paws’ mobile veterinary clinic as well as behavioral training, depending on a pet’s individual needs.

 

“Our program will provide a much-needed safety net for abuse victims with pets, and we hope that more victims will leave their abusers knowing that their pets will be well-protected and cared for,” Gullo said.

 

Original Article:

https://santamariatimes.com/news/local/safe-haven-program-offers-care-for-santa-barbara-county-domestic/article_ac0e2234-a106-58c8-b52d-ea60f9e1b331.html

Pet Emergency Training for First Responders on Edhat

Pet Emergency Training for First Responders on Edhat

Source: Santa Barbara County Fire Department

Starting February 3, nonprofit organization C.A.R.E.4Paws, pet emergency hospital Advanced Veterinary Specialists (AVS) and dog trainer Brian Glen will host a dozen workshops in pet emergency training for the Santa Barbara County Fire Department, covering 16 fire stations from Santa Barbara to Santa Maria. The free workshops, offered through C.A.R.E.4Paws’ recently launched Pet Emergency Training (P.E.T.) for First Responders program, will teach County firefighters how to safely care for and treat pets in emergency situations, covering pet first-aid and animal behavior.

According to American Animal Hospital Association, one out of four animals would survive a life-threatening injury if just one first-aid technique was applied before the pet reaches a veterinary hospital. First responders, who are usually the first to arrive on the scene of a fire, accident or other emergency, are generally not trained to provide medical treatment to pets. This is why C.A.R.E.4Paws introduced the P.E.T. program with its partners in November 2019, starting off with five workshops for Santa Barbara City and Montecito Fire Departments.

“We always want to do everything possible for all pets to give them the most favorable outcome,” says Dr. Andrea Wells, owner of AVS and an internal medicine specialist. “Immediate care and stabilization can be key to a successful recovery from injury. We are honored to work with our first responders to provide care for pets in need of urgent attention.”

During each two-hour workshop, Dr. Wells and her AVS team provide at least an hour of hands-on medical training, covering anything from CPR, wound treatment and handling of broken limbs to how to provide fluids and other critical care to an overheated animal. First responders get to practice the different techniques working with dogs and cats owned by AVS staff members.

Because most cats and dogs act differently when injured or in distress, the workshops also focus on animal behavior and techniques for how to safely capture, handle and restrain pets, whether to ensure the animals receive medical treatment or to remove them from a dangerous situation.

 

During the second half of a workshop, dog trainer Brian Glen talks about dog psychology and shares tools for how to deal with protective or aggressive dogs, who can cause harm to a first responder and prevent the pet owner from receiving critical care in a timely way.

“The goal is to prepare our first responders as much as possible for the various scenarios they encounter that involve pets,” says C.A.R.E.4Paws’ Executive Director Isabelle Gullo, who notes that pet first-aid kits are in the works to be carried aboard fire engines and other emergency vehicles. “We also want to share information about the many services C.A.R.E.4Paws offers for low-income, senior, and homeless community members so that first responders can share these resources with the pet owners they meet in the field.”

These services include assistance with veterinary care, vaccinations and spays/neuters in C.A.R.E.4Paws’ mobile clinic, help with pet food, information about animal abuse, and access to a brand-new program that assists victims of domestic violence and their pets.

The first of the 12 upcoming workshops with the Santa Barbara County Fire Department will take place on Monday, February 3, at the department’s Station 26 in Orcutt (1600 Tiffany Park Court) from 10am to noon.

“The Santa Barbara County Fire Department is excited to engage in these not only pertinent, but very beneficial skills for our firefighters,” says Public Information Officer Captain Daniel Bertucelli. “We, as first responders, encounter animals on a regular basis and knowing how to approach, calm and treat an animal in distress to ensure a positive outcome is important for all involved.”

For more information about Pet Emergency Training (P.E.T.) for First Responders, visit care4paws.org/pet or contact C.A.R.E.4Paws at info@care4paws.org or (805) 968-2273.

Original Article:

https://www.edhat.com/news/firefighters-learn-how-to-care-for-pets-during-emergencies