Joy for Jojo

Joy for Jojo

Jojo is a sweet and much-loved senior pup. But as his owner, Paula Herschede, explains, his airborne allergies can make him miserable, causing him to rip out his fur and rub his eyes so hard that he scratches them. Paula is desperate to help Jojo, but her financial situation makes it difficult to pay for his costly medication. Luckily, C.A.R.E.4Paws’ mobile clinic has been able to help Jojo, and he’s now feeling great.

“We are so lucky to have such a wonderful group like C.A.R.E.4Paws to help those in need,” Paula says. “My hope is that C.A.R.E.4Paws finds kindness in return in the magnitude it is given.”

C.A.R.E.4Paws continues to help Central Coast families care for their pets

C.A.R.E.4Paws continues to help Central Coast families care for their pets

Published October 6, 2022 

Locals lined up with their pets Wednesday for an affordable pop-up pet clinic to get the services and information they needed for their furry friends.

The C.A.R.E.4Paws Mobile Unit set up shop at the Elwin Mussell Senior Center in Santa Maria — the unit has been helping families and their pets on the Central Coast for about 10 years and the program continues to grow.

“Our main purpose is to lower pet overpopulation and promote responsible pet ownership in Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo counties,” said Carlos Abitia, C.A.R.E.4Paws’ mobile services coordinator. “We do this by promoting free spays and neuters. This year, we are close to 2,000 spays and neuters and we treat about 10,000 animals to low-income pet families.”

Spaying or neutering a dog or cat can typically cost up to $500, but C.A.R.E.4Paws provides them at no charge for local families who qualify for assistance. The program also provides other services to help keep pets, and their owners, happy and healthy. It offers medical services and also preventative pet maintenance.

“This is very purposeful work, there is nothing else I would rather be doing than making people and pets smile,” said Lisa Bolton, a veterinarian technician with C.A.R.E.4Paws.

C.A.R.E.4Paws can help ease the stresses of pet ownership, particularly in situations where pet owners can’t afford to help keep their animal healthy.

“This allows us to pull away the judgment. It’s really hard in this day and age to be able to afford these things for your animals,” said Dr. Shana Schank, who was busy performing surgery on a female pit-bull Wednesday. “The reality is the cost of pet care is high and we are doing the best we can to provide services for people who can’t do that and want to keep their pets.”

While some people lined up for quick services for their pet such as vaccines or a microchip tracking device, some owners dropped off their pets at Wednesday’s clinic early in the morning for more serious procedures.

“When pets get the proper care, it keeps the public safer,” Abitia said. “If all pets get rabies vaccines, this helps prevent a possible outbreak. For pets’ comfort, flea treatments, nail trimmings and wound care are just a few more services that C.A.R.E.4Paws offers.

“We work to promote empathy and compassion. Those are values that not only help the animals, but help the community as a whole. The more empathy and compassion a community has, the better we are going to do as a city, as a county and as a nation.”

C.A.R.E.4Paws’ Mobile Unit, depending on the services, offers both appointments and walk-ins. For more information or to make an appointment, call 805-968-CARE (2273) or email info@care4paws.org or visit care4paws.org/clinics. The C.A.R.E stands for Community awareness, responsibility, education. 

C.A.R.E.4PAWS Safe Haven program in desperate need for dog foster homes in Santa Barbara

C.A.R.E.4PAWS Safe Haven program in desperate need for dog foster homes in Santa Barbara

Published October 4, 2022 8:37 am

SANTA BARBARA, Calif. – Nothing is more difficult for Wendy Domanski of C.A.R.E.4PAWS than seeing pets in need of a home.

The Safe Haven program provides temporary anonymous fostering for survivors of domestic violence.

Two weeks ago, Domestic Violence Solutions and C.A.R.E.4PAWS hosted its first inaugural Walk Against Abuse event.

Organizers of the event say 200 people came out with their dogs to walk against abuse for people and animals.

Proceeds went to the Safe Haven program which provides temporary anonymous fostering for survivors of domestic violence.

Despite the high turnout to the event, organizers say there is still a need to recruit more
foster families.

“We have three large dogs in our program that would love nothing more than to get a foster family. However, right now it is very difficult to find foster families,” said Domanski.

Domanski said local shelters are overcrowded, not just here in Santa Barbara, but throughout the country.

“Right now a lot of people are returning their pets because they’ve gone back to work they don’t have time to care for them,” said Domanski.

Kate Chapman supports C.A.R.E.4PAWS, and hopes more people will become a foster pet family for the organization.

“I hope that people get alerted I mean get educated about a problem that could be so easily solved I hope that all the animals eventually get homes sooner the better,” said Chapman.

If you are able to be a foster pet family, Domanski said the Safe Haven program will provide all of the food, supplies, vet care, training and anything the pet may need.

“We would love to just increase our bank of foster families that are readily available, that can accommodate these pets so that we can get them into a loving home as soon as possible,” said Domanski.

The Safe Haven program provides all of the food, supplies, vet care, training and anything the pet may need.

Domanski said the foster just needs to provide a loving and safe home for the pet until they can be reunited with their owners.

She said having wonderful foster families is such a critical part of this program, and they desperately need more foster families.

If you are interested in becoming a foster to helping these pets, please contact C.A.R.E.4PAWS paws at foster@care4paws.org.